Keynote Speakers

Prof. Peter Luijten
Keynote titel: Developments in MRI 

Peter R. Luijten received his training in physical and theoretical chemistry from 1972-1979 (Amsterdam). After finalizing his thesis on NMR studies of molecular dynamics in liquid crystals (1984, Amsterdam, San Diego), he became a research scientist at Philips Medical Systems in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging division. He developed multiple new technologies resulting in several patent applications and peer reviewed scientific journals. In 2005 he was appointed Professor of Functional Medical Imaging at the University Medical Center in Utrecht, chair of the imaging department in 2014 and director of the UMC Utrecht Center for Image Sciences in 2015.

 

Prof. Jurgen Debus
Keynote titel: Where do we go with online and real-time MRI guidance?

 

 

Invited Speakers

Not defined yet

 

Local Organizing Committee

Professor Jan J.W. Lagendijk (chairman)
Jan Lagendijk is a professor and chief of Radiation Oncology Physics in the Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Centre Utrecht. His group is a major participant of Center of Image Sciences, a research group with a focus on the development of new imaging technology and applications in Radiology, Nuclear medicine and Radiotherapy, with over 160 PhD students. His research group has a strong focus on all aspects of the development of MRI in Radiotherapy. He invented the MRI linac which is presently being commercialized by Elekta in close collaboration with Philips. His publications include over 200 peer reviewed journal articles.

 

Professor Bas Raaymakers (chairman)
Bas Raaymakers (1972) works as professor experimental clinical physics at the department of Radiotherapy of the University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. The idea of integrating a radiotherapy accelerator with a 1.5 T MRI was launched and explored together with Jan Lagendijk in the UMC Utrecht. Together with Elekta and Philips a first prototype hybrid MRI accelerator was built to give the proof of concept, a second and third prototype followed. Currently Bas’s main challenge is to translate the MRI accelerator research into the radiotherapy clinic. E.g. MRI based adaptive radiotherapy strategies and fast, on-line plan adaptations.

 

Marielle E.P. Philippens
Marielle Philippens is a senior medical physicist and has been employed at the department of Radiotherapy at the UMC Utrecht since 2008. Her main area of clinical and research activities is MR imaging for image guided radiotherapy. This includes the improvement of target delineation using pathological validation of imaging, prediction of treatment outcome and assessment of normal tissue effects using MR techniques. Her focus is on head and neck cancer, rectal cancer and breast cancer. She is project leader of KWF grants in head and neck cancer, pathological image validation and vascular effects in brain. Special interest is in diffusion weighted imaging for target delineation and response monitoring for MRI in radiotherapy. She is involved in the MR linac project as MR physicist.

She is course director of several basic and advanced MRI in radiotherapy courses for radiation oncologists, physicists and RTTs.

She graduated in Molecular Sciences at Wageningen University and Medicine at the Radboud University Nijmegen. She obtained her PhD on MRI and NTCP modeling in radiotherapy at the medical faculty of the Radboud University and her registration as medical physicist at the department Radiation Oncology at the Radboud University.

Rien Moerland
Rien Moerland is a senior medical physicist at the department of Radiotherapy at the UMC Utrecht. His main area of clinical and research activities is MRI guided brachytherapy. This includes the use of MRI for implant reconstruction and treatment verification, the development of an MR conditional prostate implant robot and together with Elekta the development of an MR conditional brachytherapy afterloader.
He graduated in Physics at Delft University and obtained his PhD on “MRI in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning” at the Utrecht University and his registration as medical physicist at the department of Radiation Oncology at the UMC Utrecht.

 

Ina Jürgenliemk-Schulz

Ina Jürgenliemk-Schulz graduated in Biology at the University of Bochum, Germany in 1983. After medical study she received her MD from the same University in 1989 and completed her PhD in 1990. She is currently staff radiation oncologist at UMCU. Concerning clinical interest she specialized in external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy for gynecologic primary tumors and nodal disease. With respect to technical challenges she introduced MRI guided brachytherapy including applicator development and is currently responsible for the clinical implementation of the MRI Linac in Utrecht.

 

Robbert Tersteeg

 

Rob Tijssen
Rob Tijssen is a medical physicist at the department of radiotherapy at the UMC Utrecht. His clinical duties involve (kV-based) position verification, MRI for treatment planning (MR-sim), and the clinical introduction of the MR-linac. He is project leader on a NWO-HTSM grant in which new, ultra-fast, MR methods are being developed for real-time motion management on the MR-linac. Rob received an MSc in Medical Engineering from the Technical University of Eindhoven in 2007. In 2011 he received a DPhil in Clinical Neurology at the University of Oxford after which he enrolled as a medical physics resident at the UMC Utrecht.

 

Nico van den Berg
Nico van den Berg is an Associate Professor working as an MR physicist in the department of Radiotherapy of the University Medical Center Utrecht. His work has covered all aspects of MRI Physics from first principles modelling and MR hardware engineering to clinical scan protocols development for radiotherapy applications. He heads a research group developing new MR methods for radiotherapy applications. This includes MRI-only radiation planning, quantitative MRI techniques for tumor delineation and characterization; fast volumetric tracking of tumor/organ motion for MR guided radiation delivery and the design of a new radiolucent coil arrays for the MR-Linac. His publications include over 85 peer reviewed journal articles. He is involved as lecturer in various courses of MRI in radiotherapy. 

 

Clinical Scientific Committee
Jurgen Debus

 

Dave Fuller

 

Kevin Harrington

 

Keiichi Jingu, MD is Professor and Chair of Department of Radiation Oncology at Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine. The institution is one of the highest volume center for radiation therapy. His sub-specialty is radiotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer and head & neck cancer. He is undergoing some studies with functional image, including MRI, to predict the efficacy of radiotherapy.

Professor Cynthia Ménard 
Cynthia Ménard is associate clinical professor at the department of radiology, radiation oncology and nuclear medicine at the University of Montreal. The primary focus of Cynthia’s scholarly activity is to better individualize radiation therapy through the development, validation, and clinical application of magnetic resonance imaging techniques to radiation treatment planning, response assessment, and treatment adaptation. She has specifically invested her efforts to improving radiotherapy to the brain and for prostate cancer. She is also affiliated with the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the University of Toronto.

 

A/Professor Parag Parikh 
Parag Parikh is an Associate Professor in Biomedical Engineering and Radiation Oncology at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. He also serves as the gastrointestinal cancer service chief in the department. Dr. Parikh’s research interests have been in translating technology, especially that relating to organ position and motion, into clinical trials and practice.  He has been involved with implementation of the first integrated MRgRT system, and has the largest clinical experience in daily adaptive MR guided radiation therapy to tumors in the abdomen and pelvis.

 

Richard Potter

 

Christopher Schultz

Christopher Schultz, MD is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin with a secondary appointment in the Department of Neurosurgery.  He is an active clinician/researcher and member of the Head and Neck, Neuro-Oncology, and Lymphoma cancer service lines and directs the Gamma Knife program at Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital.  He is a full member of the MCW Cancer Center and serves on the MCWCC Executive Committee. He currently chairs the clinical steering committee of the Elekta MR linac consortium.

 

Ina Schultz

 

Professor Ben Slotman

Ben Slotman is Professor and Chair of Radiation Oncology at Vrije Universiteit medical center in Amsterdam. He  is the (co)-author of more than 340 peer-reviewed publications and has (co-)organized many scientific meetings. He is currently President of the American Radium Society and Board member of the Radiosurgery Society.  His expertise lies  mainly in the field of lung cancer and the early introduction of new technologies in radiotherapy. He is one of the first clinical users and investigators in the field of MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy.

 

Professor Takashi Uno

Takashi Uno is the chairman of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Chiba University, Japan, and one of the current JASTRO board of directors. Professor Uno organizes both diagnostic and therapeutic department, and thus he has actively incorporated MRI into radiation therapy. He specializes in high precision image-guided radiation therapy such as stereotactic body radiation therapy and IMRT for head&neck as well as gynecologic cancers. He is also one of the leaders of MRI-based image-guided brachytherapy in Japan.

 

Physics Scientific Committee

 

Professor James Balter 
Dr. Balter is a Radiation Oncology Physicist with primary clinical interests in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy, including the optimal implementation and use of MRI for Radiation Therapy simulation.His primary research focuses on dynamic human modelling, aimed generally at extracting information to update representations of tumor and normal tissue configurations and states as efficiently as possible.  He has developed novel image alignment as well as dynamic tomographic image volume reconstruction algorithms, characterized organ movements, and studied the impact of alignment uncertainty on radiation dose, and more recently has worked on development of synthetic CT models of patients to support MRI-only radiation therapy simulation.

 

John Bayouth

 

Stuart Crozier

 

Professor B. Gino Fallone
Professor B. Gino Fallone is academic, educational and clinical Director of Medical Physics at the University of Alberta and the Cross Cancer Institute. He has published on the development of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy, linac-based radiosurgery, inverse  planning, Monte Carlo, image fusion, imaging analysis, CT-MR simulation,  general/flat-panel detectors, fast MR imaging, MR magnet design, deterministic solution of Boltzmann in magnetic fields and holder of several patents on the bi-planar linac MR systems and others.  Amongst other awards, he has been Knighted by the Italian Order of Merit for his work. He directed the development and construction of the first integrated linac-MR system, whole-body linac-MR systems and  is currently co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions, a spin-off  to commercialize the bi-planar linac MR system, the Aurora-RTTM.

 

Professor Peter Greer
Peter Greer completed his MSc in medical physics in New Zealand and his PhD at the University of Adelaide, Australia in 2001. He has worked as a radiation oncology medical physicist in New Zealand, Canada and Australia. He currently leads medical physics research at Calvary Mater Newcastle and University of Newcastle. His major areas of research and development interest are electronic portal imaging and MRI-based planning.

 

Professor Geoffrey S. Ibbott

Geoff Ibbott is a professor in the Department of Radiation Physics at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas.  He served as chairman of the department until March 2017, and was previously the Director of the Radiological Physics Center, now IROC-Houston. His current interests are novel 3D dosimetry systems and image-guided radiation therapy.  These two interests coincide with the development and installation at MD Anderson of a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy capability.

 

David Jaffray

 

Professor Oliver Jäkel
Oliver Jäkel is a professor for medical physics at Heidelberg University. He is head of the division for Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology of the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), which is part of the Heidelberg MR-Linac consortium. The consortium is running a clinical study on offline MR-guidance at DKFZ and preparing the operation of a hybrid machine at the university medical Center. Oliver Jäkel also is the head of Medical Physics team of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) of the University Medical Center. His special interest is the development of MR-guided particle therapy.

 

Professor Paul Keall 
Paul Keall is a Professor in the Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney and an NHMRC Senior Professorial Research Fellow.  Prof. Keall and his team of 20 scientists have the mission to create, share and apply novel cancer imaging and targeted radiotherapy methods that improve human health. His team have achieved significant bench-to-bedside clinical translational milestones in cancer imaging and targeted radiotherapy. Additional programs include the research and development of the Australian MRI-Linear accelerator, and the Nano-X cancer radiotherapy system.

 

Professor Jan J.W. Lagendijk (chairman)
Jan Lagendijk is a professor and chief of Radiation Oncology Physics in the Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Centre Utrecht. His group is a major participant of Center of Image Sciences, a research group with a focus on the development of new imaging technology and applications in Radiology, Nuclear medicine and Radiotherapy, with over 160 PhD students. His research group has a strong focus on all aspects of the development of MRI in Radiotherapy. He invented the MRI linac which is presently being commercialized by Elekta in close collaboration with Philips. His publications include over 200 peer reviewed journal articles.

 

 

Allen Li

Dr. Li is a professor and chief of medical physics in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin. His research interests include adaptive radiation therapy strategies, biological modelling for radiation treatment planning and quantitative imaging for adaptive radiotherapy. Prof. Li and his team are recently focusing on developing methods and tools for MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy. His publications include over 180 peer reviewed journal articles and a textbook entitled “Adaptive Radiation Therapy”.

 

A/Professor Gary Liney

A/Prof Liney is the senior medical physicist at the Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research and Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre, Sydney, Australia. He is providing the scientific lead into the MRI-simulator and MRI-Linac programs at Liverpool. He is a recognised expert in the use and integration of MRI techniques into radiotherapy planning, and published over 60 scientific papers and three textbooks and co-editor of the title ‘MR in Radiotherapy’ in 2018. Gary was the ‘MR in RT’ Symposium chair at last year’s meeting in Sydney. The focus of his current research is split between developing MRI techniques for radiotherapy both on a clinical system and the hybrid Australian MRI-Linac system in the Ingham Institute research bunker. He is currently leading the investigations on the phase 2 bespoke system using a split bore open magnet to provide real-time MRI guided radiotherapy.

 

Professor Daniel Low

Dr. Daniel Low, Ph.D. is a Professor and the Vice-Chair of Medical Physics in the Department of Radiation Oncology at UCLA.  Dr. Low is interested in the applications of MRI in Radiation Oncology, specifically in-room MR Guidance and the development of functional imaging protocols to predict and manage patient-specific radiation response.  Dr. Low is also interested in breathing motion characterization and management using state-of-the art imaging techniques.

 

Sasa Mutic

 

A/Professor Tufve Nyholm
Tufve works at Umeå University in Umeå, and Akademiska hospital in Uppsala, both in Sweden. Mainly with research focusing on MRI for planning and guidance of radiotherapy. In Umeå the research group works with a PET/MR scanner dedicated for radiotherapy and in Uppsala the focus is on implementation of an MR-Linac (Atlantic). Nyholm is one of two operating project leaders for the Swedish consortium “Gentle Radiotherapy” is a joint initiative between academia, industry and healthcare aiming at development and implementation of MR based radiotherapy.

 

ProfessorUwe Oelfke

Professor Uwe Oelfke is head of the Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust (RMH), and deputy head of the Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging (ICR).  He began his career in Theoretical Nuclear Physics, later transferring to Medical Physics.

He firmly believes that Medical Physics research on cancer imaging and therapy is an essential component to improve the clinical outcomes of radiation oncology.  ICR and RMH, as a world leading comprehensive cancer centre, now initiates the next generation of radiotherapy treatments by combining the most recent developments in cancer biology, cancer therapeutics and medical physics in a truly interdisciplinary approach.   Professor Oelfke’s Radiotherapy Physics Modelling Team is researching ways of using modern hardware to improve the delivery of targeted radiotherapy and is part of a team of physicists and clinicians taking a leading role in enhancing the performance of the MR Linac technology before its routine use in patients.

 

Eric Paulsen

 

Professor Bas Raaymakers
Bas Raaymakers (1972) works as professor experimental clinical physics at the department of Radiotherapy of the University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. The idea of integrating a radiotherapy accelerator with a 1.5 T MRI was launched and explored together with Jan Lagendijk in the UMC Utrecht. Together with Elekta and Philips a first prototype hybrid MRI accelerator was built to give the proof of concept, a second and third prototype followed. Currently Bas’s main challenge is to translate the MRI accelerator research into the radiotherapy clinic. E.g. MRI based adaptive radiotherapy strategies and fast, on-line plan adaptations.

 

Kari Tanderup

 

Neelam Tyagi
Dr Tyagi is an Assistant Attending Physicist in the department of Medical Physics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Her clinical and research efforts are focused on integrating MRI in treatment planning for various body sites including MR-only planning.  She is also interested in using tumor morphology and physiology information from advanced MR imaging towards personalize radiotherapy for improved patient outcomes

 

Professor Uulke A. van der Heide 
Uulke van der Heide works as a medical physicist and group leader at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He holds a chair as professor of imaging technology in radiotherapy at the Leiden University. He participates as a teacher on MRI for radiotherapy in the ESTRO school. His research group works on the improvement of target definition in radiotherapy by application of MRI and the development and validation of quantitative imaging methods for tumor characterization for radiotherapy dose painting. He further leads the MR-guided radiotherapy program at the Netherlands Cancer Institute.